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Two Rutland soldiers, both from Ketton, are buried in this cemetery. Robert Dicks and George Jackson, from different battalions of the Leicestershire Regiment, died nine months apart but ended up lying here near each other. The village of Grevillers was occupied by Commonwealth troops on 14 March 1917 and in April and May, the 3rd, 29th and 3rd Australian Casualty Clearing Stations were posted nearby. They began the cemetery and continued to use it until March 1918, when Grevillers was lost to the German during their great advance. On the following 24 August, the New Zealand Division recaptured Grevillers and in September, the 34th, 49th and 56th Casualty Clearing Stations came to the village and used the cemetery again. After the Armistice, 200 graves were brought in from the battlefields to the south of the village, 40 from an adjoining cemetery made during the German occupation, and some from the nearby smaller cemeteries. The cemetery and memorial were designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

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Rutland and The Battle of the Somme

More than 90 Rutland soldiers died in the Battle of the Somme which lasted from 1 July 1916 until the middle of November. Today they lie in cemeteries across the old battlefield in northern France or are remembered among the 72,000 names on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of the Somme. By using our interactive map, you can find out what happened to them.
Albert Page of Uppingham answered Lord Kitchener’s call & enlisted in November 1914, aged 21. He served at Vimy & l… https://t.co/zU7biTi9rU 8:27 PM Sep 15th

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