About

After the Battle of Le Cateau (26 August 1914), the town remained in German hands until the middle of October 1918. The original cemetery was made by the 50th (Northumbrian) Division after the fighting of 17 October; the name of Highland Cemetery is suggestive at once of the comparatively high ground on which it stands and of the 32 graves of the 13th (Scottish Horse) Battalion, Black Watch, found here. The cemetery was greatly enlarged after the Armistice when graves of October and November 1918 were brought in from isolated positions on all sides of Le Cateau. Highland Cemetery now contains 624 First World War burials. The cemetery was designed by Charles Holden.

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1 Rutlander remembered here
HILL
Harry
From Tinwell
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3 images This cemetery is just outside Le Cateau, and has several hundred men buried there, and readily accessible by wheelchair. The grave of Mr Hill is close to the top left of the cemetery, when facing the great cross.
By John Stokes on Wednesday 12th November '14 at 12:41pm
A Rutlander, living in Belgium
 

Rutland and The Battle of the Somme

More than 90 Rutland soldiers died in the Battle of the Somme which lasted from 1 July 1916 until the middle of November. Today they lie in cemeteries across the old battlefield in northern France or are remembered among the 72,000 names on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of the Somme. By using our interactive map, you can find out what happened to them.
Remembering John Breakspear of Langham in Rutland who died 100 years ago today of injuries sustained in #WW1 A careā€¦ https://t.co/t52U98HC5h 6:03 PM May 13th

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