About

After the First World War, an appropriate way had to be found of commemorating those members of the Royal Navy who had no known grave. An Admiralty committee recommended that the three manning ports in Great Britain - Chatham, Plymouth and Portsmouth - should each have an identical memorial of unmistakable naval form, an obelisk, which would serve as a leading mark for shipping. After the Second World War it was decided that the naval memorials should be extended to provide space for commemorating the naval dead without graves of that war. Chatham Naval Memorial commemorates 8,517 sailors of the First World War and around 10,000 of the Second World War.

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1 Rutlander remembered here
COULSON
John
From Tinwell
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3 images Some pictures of the Memorial, taken 1 May, 2015
By John Stokes on Friday 1st May '15 at 7:56pm
A Rutlander, living in Belgium
 

Rutland and The Battle of the Somme

More than 90 Rutland soldiers died in the Battle of the Somme which lasted from 1 July 1916 until the middle of November. Today they lie in cemeteries across the old battlefield in northern France or are remembered among the 72,000 names on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of the Somme. By using our interactive map, you can find out what happened to them.
Albert Page of Uppingham answered Lord Kitchener’s call & enlisted in November 1914, aged 21. He served at Vimy & l… https://t.co/zU7biTi9rU 8:27 PM Sep 15th

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