About

Field ambulances used the Communal Cemetery for Commonwealth burials from September 1915 to August 1916, and again during the German advance of March 1918. It contains 127 Commonwealth burials of the First World War. The XV Corps Main Dressing Station was formed at Dernancourt in August 1916, when the adjoining Extension was opened. On 26 March 1918, Dernancourt was evacuated ahead of the German advance, and the Extension remained in their hands until the village was recaptured on 9 August 1918. At the Armistice, the Extension contained more than 1,700 burials; it was then enlarged when graves were brought in from isolated positions in the immediate neighbourhood and some small cemeteries. It now contains the grave of two Rutland soldiers as well as Sergeant Thomas Harris who won the VC as well as the Military Medal. The extension was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

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3 images Some pictures of the cemetery, taken on 22 August 2015.
By John Stokes on Sunday 6th December '15 at 3:07pm
A Rutlander, living in Belgium
2 images Some pictures of the cemetery, taken on 22 August 2015.
By John Stokes on Sunday 6th December '15 at 3:27pm
A Rutlander, living in Belgium
 

Rutland and The Battle of the Somme

More than 90 Rutland soldiers died in the Battle of the Somme which lasted from 1 July 1916 until the middle of November. Today they lie in cemeteries across the old battlefield in northern France or are remembered among the 72,000 names on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of the Somme. By using our interactive map, you can find out what happened to them.
Albert Page of Uppingham answered Lord Kitchener’s call & enlisted in November 1914, aged 21. He served at Vimy & l… https://t.co/zU7biTi9rU 8:27 PM Sep 15th

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